GEMA database

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GEMA's company emblem.

The GEMA database is a website hosted by the German organization GEMA (Gesellschaft für musikalische Aufführungs) (Society for musical performance). The GEMA database has been open to the public since 2003, facilitating information on a reported "1.6 Million copyrighted musical works"[1]

Many unreleased Rammstein demos and a plethora of otherwise unknown information regarding some Rammstein songs is documented in the database, making it a viable, reliable source of information.

Functionality

The database's search page provides users with the ability to search for songs by their name, ISWC (International Standard Musical Work Code), or standard work code, on top of also allowing users to search for songs by their performing artists or publishers. A misconception is that the GEMA database houses the actual songs listed in audio form, but this is not true; the database only maintains information on these songs, which is retrieved when searched for.

When an individual song is viewed in the database, all known information is presented, including the song title, duration, involved musicians (individually; it will not list the name of the involved band, but of every member), as well as any further working titles for the track, if any exist. When individual musicians' names are shown in the database entries, their unique artist number (IP Name No.), as well as their role in production (composer and author are the two typical roles that musicians are listed with).

While being a German website, song titles are not listed with actual umlauts where they typically should be (ä,ö,ü); they instead appear as ae,oe,ue (For example, Feuerräder would be Feuerraeder), however searching for song names using umlauts will return the same results as if searching with ae, oe and ue.

Connection to Rammstein

The GEMA database provides a wealth of information that would be otherwise unknown. Below are such examples:

As well as many other things.

Sources